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Career Advice - Career - Daniel Porot expand
 

Fulfillment (7)

I retired from the U.S. Army in 1994 as a chaplain assistant. I have supervisory experience, administrative experience, computer/technical experience, yet those types of jobs really leave me empty. I since have worked in the computer technical area, banking, retail, etc. I have pastored two churches since retiring, but there have been changes to my spiritual journey that have left me as a priest who has become a Buddhist! My passions are music, cycling (it was), writing, reading, photography and most importantly spirituality.

How does one find a job based upon his or her passions in life? How does one find a job that will relate to what one loves or enjoys? What steps does on take in the search? How does one "fix" their resume to that effect?

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I am 24 and have an undergraduate degree in business management from a state school in Florida. I graduated last December and took a job running my father's RV dealership. I made a little more than $100,000 last year, but feel as if I am not moving ahead in a career setting. I have been thinking about going back for my M.B.A. and looking for a job in the financial field. I also have had the dream of working on Wall Street. What should I do and what is the best avenue to get there?

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I currently have a well-paying job but have really grown to hate it. I was working from home for a couple of years and just recently started back in the office, which opened my eyes. I think that I didn't see how unhappy I was until I had to come back into the office environment. I really want to start my own non-medical home-care business but I am hesitant. I make more money than my husband and I also cover the benefits since his company doesn't offer them. Not sure if I should take the risk and start my own business or stay where I am. Help!

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I am a 47-year-old disabled male with more than 20 years in the banking/customer service area, 17 years as a collector. I want to stay in a field that deals with people in a more positive light. Suggestions are welcome. I left my last job because it lacked professionalism. What's more important — money or happiness?

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I am 32 years old with no degree and have been considering going back to school for an M.B.A. I have a great job and a great house in an awesome resort town on Lake Michigan. I work in a bar and the lifestyle is starting to take its toll on me. I love my boss so much that the idea of leaving him to pursue another career crushes me. I have the resources to buy into the bar but he doesn't seem to want me to for fear that in order for his business to be successful, he needs a partner with deeper pockets. I have what I estimate to be a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to run a computer-networking company that I recently founded with an incredibly talented partner. We have discovered a technology that no one really understands yet and I'm afraid that my inability to run a business will render the whole thing and my life a scrap heap.

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I'm studying Spanish and management at University College London, but want to change my concentration because I don't like the courses I'm taking. My goal is to earn a generous income by working in the international marketing or publishing side of the music industry. I speak English and French fluently and have a good understanding of Spanish.

Next year I plan on studying business finance at Durham University or European business at Portsmouth University. Which choice would best position me for achieving my goal? Also, which extracurricular activities should I participate in?

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Some people probably do achieve emotional satisfaction from their work, but for most people this isn't possible. I am sure doctors get satisfaction from bringing babies into the world, or saving someone's life, but for people who do endlessly meaningless jobs it is doubtful that they receive the same satisfaction. For most people work is just like it sounds -- WORK! It is work just to get up, get to work and get through the day without snapping at someone. The only satisfaction I receive (sort of) is from getting paid, and that has nothing to do with emotional fulfillment.

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